I am somewhat thrilled to be reading more for reading’s sake — lounging around in my free time, book in hand, simply enjoying books. Something I definitely haven’t done enough of in recent years.

#14: Ancillary Sword (Ann Leckie)

So, on Goodreads, it’s sometimes hard to avoid going and looking at the reviews for a book you haven’t read yet but plan to. I glanced at a few reviews for Ancillary Sword while I was marking the book as “Currently Reading”, and the general tone seemed to be “not as good as the first” — which I don’t understand. The story is different, smaller, but that rug had already been pulled at the end of the first book. This book moves on quite well all on its own, both building towards the next book and obscuring any idea what that book is going to be like.

After I post this, I’m going to go and pre-order the third book — so I guess that’s pretty high praise, right?

#11: My Real Children (Jo Walton)

This book was wonderful, and I am loathe to say anything about it at all — if the back-cover copy appeals, my recommendation is that you read it post-haste. A divergent biography. There, a nice, unspoilery description.

(I should’ve known better than to try and finish this one off during lunch — I was getting red-eyed and sniffly at the diner.)

#5-10: Six Harry Bosch novels (Michael Connelly)

So Amazon had an original series called “Bosch”, which I enjoyed, so I decided I’d read the first of the novels, detective procedurals centering around the unlikely-named Heironymous Bosch. Great popcorn fun, as evidenced by the fact that I read six of them at a clip. Bosch isn’t the One Good Cop, but it’s a close thing — and it’s fun to see the characters move through time. I have to read some other stuff in between to keep from getting burnt out, though.

Well, plus the next one is technically in a different series altogether, and I’m not sure if I need to read the others in that series first before tackling it. Ah, decisions. Well, it’s not as if I’m lacking for things to read.

#3: Lock In (John Scalzi)

I really enjoyed this — a lightweight SF detective novel. SF detective stories are difficult, because the technology compromises the reader’s ability to figure things out; Lock In gets around that by being more of a light action-movie of a book, and gamely explaining everything it needs to to get you to understand the clockwork of the plots and plans.

I bought the book when it came out, more because I was thrilled to find an indie bookstore had opened up off of Fountain Square than because I wanted a dead-tree version of the book — I was planning on getting it for the Kindle. Now I’m glad I got it, though